First Line Fridays – June 8

first-lines-fridays

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

“After killing the red-haired man, I took myself off to Quinn’s for an oyster supper.

It had been surprisingly- almost laughably- easy. I had followed him for some distance, after first observing him in Threadneedle Street. I cannot say why I decided it should be him, and not one of the others on whom my searching eye had alighted that evening. I had been walking for an hour or more in the vicinity with one purpose: to find someone to kill. Then I saw him, outside the entrance to the Bank, amongst a huddle of pedestrians waiting for the crossing-sweeper to do his work. Somehow he seemed to stand out from the crowd of identically dressed clerks and City men streaming forth from the premises. He stood regarding the milling scene around him, as if turning something over in his mind. I thought for a moment that he was about to retrace his steps; instead, he pulled on his gloves and moved away from the crossing point, and set off briskly. A few seconds later, I began to follow him.”

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themeaningofnight

The Meaning of Night (The Meaning of Night #1) by Michael Cox

I read this book a few years ago and recall being absorbed by it. The details Cox wrote in really pulled you into the story and the characters were multifaceted. There were also several twists and turns that took me by surprise which I love in a good story. While the ending of the book was not what I had expected, the rest of the story was intriguing and I would recommend this book to fans of mystery or suspense.

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Convinced he is destined for greatness, Glyver will stop at nothing to win back a prize that he knows is rightfully his. A story of betrayal and treachery, of death and delusion, of ruthless obsession and ambition.

The atmosphere of Bleak House, the sensuous thrill of Perfume, and the mystery of Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell all combine in a story of murder, deceit, love, and revenge in Victorian England.

“After killing the red-haired man, I took myself off to Quinn’s for an oyster supper.”

So begins the extraordinary story of Edward Glyver–booklover, scholar, and murderer. As a young boy, Glyver always believed he was destined for greatness. A chance discovery convinces him that he was right: greatness does await him, along with immense wealth and influence. Overwhelmed by his discovery, he will stop at nothing to win back a prize that he knows is rightfully his.

Glyver’s path to reclaim his prize leads him from the depths of Victorian London, with its foggy streets, brothels, and opium dens, to Evenwood, one of England’s most beautiful and enchanting country houses, and finally to a consuming love for the beautiful but enigmatic Emily Carteret. His is a story of betrayal and treachery, of death and delusion, of ruthless obsession and ambition. And at every turn, driving Glyver irresistibly onward, is his deadly rival: the poet-criminal Phoebus Rainsford Daunt.

The Meaning of Night is an enthralling novel that will captivate readers right up to its final thrilling revelation. (from Goodreads)

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Find this book on

Goodreads | Amazon US | Amazon UK | Book Depository | Thriftbooks

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